Monthly Archives: January 2013

Looking for the sun

What do you do when it’s cold, wet and gray? You escape, right? But what if the weather forecast tells you that it sucks all over the place? You just start going south, right?

And what if you hit a place like this? Do you stop and take a picture?

I had about 4 shots Ilford HP5+ left which I had started to expose at ISO 800. I measured it right into the sun and added another 2 stops not to underdevelop the shadows. I set the aperture to 16 to get a nice depth of field, waited for the traffic to clear, took the shot and got of the street again.

And shortly after I found this … I stopped the car, walked back a bit and gave it a try. Even though I realize now I should have framed it a bit higher but maybe I crop the bottom off a bit.

I drove on to Castle Neuschwanstein and hoped to find the castle in fog. I just took a picture from the foot of the mountain. I liked the fog in the trees on the bottom and the icy bits in the foreground. And of course the beautiful sky with a hint of clouds.

In the evening, I developed the film for 1:30:00 in 1+100 Rodinal at 20C only slightly moving the tank after 30min and 60min. In dark areas the developer will not do much and stay “fresh” while the developer in bright areas is used up quickly. An exchange of of developer only happens in the areas of transition from dark to bright which enhances sharpness. In addition the bright areas won’t continue to develop and the darker areas can still develop more.

I think this kind of semi stand developing works well for architecture and landscapes. I would go for 1+25 or 1+50 mixtures and rather frequent agitation for portrait work.

 

 

 

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Inopportune by Cai Guo-Qiang

One of my favorite museums is the Mass MOCA in North Adams, MA. When I was living in New York, I would visit almost once a year. Another good reason to go there is the yearly Williamstown Theater Festival. Just remember to book accommodation and tickets for the show early. And last but not least the Berkshires with its softly rolling hills is just beautiful.

What’s so special about Mass MOCA? It’s huge. There is so much space. The huge factory halls are just asking for big installations like Cai Guo Qiang‘s exploding car (Inopportune Stage One). I think the entire installation is more than 100m (300feet) long. Not sure if the images can somehow give a feeling of the real size.

Not as big is the installation of shot tigers called Inopportune Stage Two. It’s rather weird to walk through this hall of jumping and dying tigers.

Finally, here is a close up. Poor tiger, killed by so many arrows. I guess I wouldn’t want to be this guy.

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